Getting back to home life

Every traveller will tell you – it’s hard to get back into the swing of things.

I was lucky. I planned to have ample buffer time for assimilation and it has worked out great. Although being too idle has some disadvantages. But of course, the idea here is not to be idle and instead gradually build up momentum to sort of… be as you were (*shudder).

Any regrets on your travels?

On the morning of 4 June 2015 two hours before my flight, I made the hasty decision of leaving behind my ‘big’ camera. My ‘big’ camera meaning my DSLR with x amount of Gb of storage space and memory cards, soft shell case, blablabla. On impulse, I thought – fuck it, it’s too big, I’m not a pro photographer anyway and I don’t want to worry about something else that may get lost or stolen.

Some useless things I brought on my travels

When I decided to go on my adventure, I knew first and foremost I wanted to travel light. I intended to be smart and clinical about it. And honestly, I thought I was. Until I was actually on the road. It was then that I realised I was such a n00b and was actually travelling with so many useless things!

The open highway, Death Valley, California - Michelle Was Here

An open travel plan would’ve suited me better

Before I embarked on my grand tour 6 months ago, I spent so much time planning on where I should be on specific dates. This helped greatly with knowing what was coming up next, how much I would need to spend (or could obsessively save) and it gave me time to research and read up on things… but I ended up feeling like I robbed my own time and my prior planning was working against me!

Some things I learned travelling alone

Travelling alone may not be for everyone. But IMO, it’s something that should be tried at least once in anyone’s life. Being alone gave me space to learn many lessons that I wouldn’t have otherwise learnt if I was travelling with a party of friends. Here are some things I learnt.